Freudian reading on othello

What are the effects of never resolving your oedipal complex?

Freudian reading on othello

Throughout his works he often quoted Shakespeare. He also became interested in the dramatist's life, espousing with some vacillation the theory, rejected by modern scholars, that the plays were written by the Earl of Oxford Shakespeare's writings have had an influence upon psychoanalysis.

Can psychoanalysis help us to understand the personality of the Bard himself? Three sources of information exist: Freud on Shakespeare From the earliest days of psychoanalysis, Freud found in Shakespeare's works evidence for the soundness of at least one of his basic postulates.

In a memorandum to [Wilhelm] Fliess he commented: A few lines later Freud pointed out that 'Titania, who refused to love her rightful husband Oberon, was obliged instead to shower her love upon Bottom, the ass of her imagination' 9, p.

In another note to Fliess he wrote: Initially Freud believed that the theme of Hamlet was related to the dramatist's life. In The Interpretation of Dreams he wrote: Method of Examining the Plays Freud considered 'the analysis of works of the imagination and of their creators. In the same note to Fliess referred to earlier, Freud said: By means of this fantasy [the writer] protected himself against the consequences of his experience.

Project MUSE - Psychoanalysis and the Problem of Evil: Debating Othello in the Classroom

So Shakespeare was right in his juxtaposition of poetry and madness the fine frenzy ' 9, p. In Delusions and Dreams in Jensen's Gradiva, he described two methods that 'may enable us. In this study the eleven earliest plays, taken in chronological order, were treated as if they were the productions of a patient in analysis.

The audience was viewed as participant-observer and transference object for the writer, its role resembling that of a therapist.

Each play was read and listened to, if recordedwith eye and ear attuned to its latent as well as its manifest content. Whatever Shakespeare had to say about psychology and mental illness was also carefully noted.

For purposes of a psychoanalytic inquiry, I have assumed that the plays are closely connected with Shakespeare's life experiences. I also proceeded on the assumption that Shakespeare wrote the plays attributed to him by his contemporaries.

Thus far I have found nothing in the plays to cause doubt that he did write them and many details to indicate that he did. I have also found that this approach to the subject tends to clear up some of the mysterious lacunae of knowledge that have fostered doubts as to the authorship.

Shakespeare's Life The general biographical outline of Shakespeare's life is well known and well documented 2, 3, The dramatist's father, John Shakespeare, the son of a farmer, became a shopkeeper in Stratford.Othello, a Shakespearean tragedy, is about how jealousy and hubris shape the destruction of the protagonist, Othello.

Iago, Othello’s right hand aide, is a cunning, jealous character and brings about Othello’s downfall through his clever manipulations to all the characters in the play, especially Othello. Psychoanalysis and the Problem of Evil: Debating Othello in the Classroom Barbara A.

Schapiro The text also allows, however, for an alternative reading that I would like to pursue. I wonder as well about the social implications of construing destructiveness or evil as acausal and uncontingent.

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The Freudian Snow, for instance, sees the. Iago, Othello’s right hand aide, is a cunning, jealous character and brings about Othello’s downfall through his clever manipulations to all the characters in the play, especially Othello.

Iago’s manipulations of Othello conform to the post-colonial reading and the features of an Aristotelian tragedy. Freudian Reading on “Othello” Is it possible for other people to act as our superegos?

What are the effects of never resolving your oedipal complex? And when a situation becomes to over whelming, do we project our thought and feelings on to our peers? Freudian Reading on “Othello’ Is it possible for other people to act as our superegos?

What are the effects of never resolving your oedipal complex? And when a situation becomes to over whelming, do we project our thought and feelings on to our peers? I am using “Through the Literary. There's actually an insightful reading of Othello in Klein's "Envy and Gratitude." For both Freud and Klein, Shakespeare 's Othello is valuable because it gets at the intensity of ambivalence: that grandly intimate connection between love and hate.

Freudian reading on othello
Project MUSE - Psychoanalysis and the Problem of Evil: Debating Othello in the Classroom